Are double-file restarts actually hurting Nascar?

2010 Richmond1 May NSCS Busch Gordon battle Okay, you can say it, I have totally lost my mind.  Why would anyone think that double-file restarts in Nascar are actually hurting the sport especially with the finishes we’ve seen this season.  Well, that’s the reason.  You aren’t following me?  Let me explain.

There is no question that the double-file restarts that Nascar instituted last season have brought excitement to the end of races and also allowed drivers to improve their track position much easier during the entire race.  All one has to do is look at Saturday night’s result at Richmond where Kyle Busch on the final restart was able to take the win away from Jeff Gordon.  You can also look back through the field and see several drivers that got a much better finish thanks to the last restart and the double-file lineup.

Here’s the rub.  Why does anyone need to pay attention to the racing for most of the event?  All most people remember is the end of the race (unless there was a major accident along the way.) With the propensity of double-file restarts in the last 30 laps or so of races, could race fans watch the first 30 laps of a race, go do something else for a couple of hours, and come back for the final 30?

Let’s be honest, the mid portion of almost any long race is pretty damn boring and not just in Nascar.  Why then would I invest 3-5 hours of a weekend day, especially in summer with nice weather to watch a race when all I need to pay attention to is the last 20-30 minutes?

Maybe I’m wrong.  Maybe this excitement will translate to the entire race and help television viewership and also actual attendance.  Maybe, then again, I could be right. Let’s just all hope that I’m crazy.

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1 Comment

  1. THE UNDERDOG ALWAYS WINS. This migth be so in other sports but what about car races. If you come back at the end of the race will the leader still be ahead, probably?


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